archaicwonder:

The Icarius Mirror, written in Etruscan on bronze from Etruria, Italy, 6th Century BC

This is the longest Etruscan mirror inscription known. It consists of 4 lines or sections along the raised rim and 3 captions in early Etruscan script, illustration of Icarius standing, with a club over his shoulder, with a Phrygian style cap, in a chariot pulled by two bearded centaurs, one carries a bunch of grapes, the other a long cutting knife and a wine bag, above Icarius is a cherub sprinkling water, below is Icarius’ dog Maera running.

The inscription reads:

Ikra the king from Mount Ossa of Ixion,
three things on this side he went to see,
I long for the brother also to go,
I cut the grapes abundant of the wine-stock to owe,
to the wine press! Young boy,
three on the side bedewed.

So far this seems to be the only contemporary example of Etruscan literature recorded, and where the text is illustrated in addition. This records a part of Greek mythology that is not yet fully known, adding some new information.

Icarius was the hero of the Attic town of Icaria who had a daughter, Erigone. He had been taught by Dionysos to make wine and the Bacchalian rites, and he loaded a wagon with wine skins, called his faithful dog Maera, and set off to spread the word about wine. He gave wine to some shepherds who got drunk, and who believed Icarius had tried to poison them. They beat him to death with clubs and buried him under a tree. Erigone looked everywhere for her father, and was finally led to him by Maera, who howled over his grave. Distracted with grief, she hanged herself from the tree over the grave. The dog also killed itself by jumping into a well. Dionysos was angered and sent a plague over the land, and the Athenian maidens, in a fit of madness, hanged themselves from trees. Dionysos honored them by placing Icarius in the sky as the constellation Boetes, Erigone as Virgo, and Maera as the Dog Star.

The unique text of the present mirror resisted all attempts to be read, until Mel Copeland succeeded. He is hereby credited with both the reading and the information of the mythological context.

Egypt’s Sun King by j. kunst on Flickr.

A beautiful head of a statue of Amenhotep III with full regalia (striped nemes headcloth with royal cobra, ceremonial beard, double crown of the unified Egypt), and with the characteristics of this king’s features: elongated, almond-shaped eyes with heavy cosmetic lines, and thick, rimmed lips.

(via ancient-egypts-secrets)

malephoto:

Hunter McIntyre | ph. Ray John Pila

ancientart:

Egyptian relief of mourning men.

This limestone relief dates to ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E., and is from Saqqara, Egypt.

This relief fragment shows two men, on the right, who make the gestures of mourners. The small cuts in the stone surface above and in front of the figures represent the dust that mourning Egyptians poured on their heads as a sign of bereavement. To the left can be seen the traces of a man in official dress who appears to be hurrying from the opened door of the tomb. Unlike many of the objects in this gallery, the scene suggests distress in the presence of death.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections69.114. +If you’re interested in learning more about mourning in ancient Egypt, check out this post I did a while ago on the matter.

langoaurelian:

A Thracian Goddess and/or a woman of high status. 380 - 350 BCE. ancient Bulgaria. the Vrasta Greave, silver and gold.

langoaurelian:

A Thracian Goddess and/or a woman of high status. 380 - 350 BCE. ancient Bulgaria. the Vrasta Greave, silver and gold.

jeannepompadour:

Courtesans on a balcony by Utagawa Yoshitora, 1869

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

John Webber
A Chief of the Sandwich Islands
England/Hawaii, 1787
National Library of Australia, Canberra
[x]
John Webber was an artist who accompanied the colonist Captain James Cook on his third voyage into the Pacific. He painted many landscapes of the South Seas Islands, as well as portraits of the inhabitants thereof.
The Hawaiian chief in the picture is probably Kalaniʻōpuʻu, who at first welcomed Captain Cook and his crew, and was later held hostage by them. The Hawaiians then made the very sensible decision to have the Captain killed. 
(Contrary to popular belief, they didn’t eat his body - cannibalism wasn’t their custom. However, in a turn of events entirely befitting his name, he was in fact cooked.)

[mod note] It’s my understanding that Cook’s death happened during an armed conflict that was the result of his own poor decisions-he was also described by eyewitnesses as being “irrationally violent”. Although some histories claim that a Hawaiian man “stole” one of his boats, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that he was actually taking hostages to try and secure the return of his own men who had deserted (yet again).  He could be said to have been “cooked”, but it was just a part of his funeral in which his bones were separated; he was given a Hawaiian burial in Kealakekua Bay.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

John Webber

A Chief of the Sandwich Islands

England/Hawaii, 1787

National Library of Australia, Canberra

[x]

John Webber was an artist who accompanied the colonist Captain James Cook on his third voyage into the Pacific. He painted many landscapes of the South Seas Islands, as well as portraits of the inhabitants thereof.

The Hawaiian chief in the picture is probably Kalaniʻōpuʻu, who at first welcomed Captain Cook and his crew, and was later held hostage by them. The Hawaiians then made the very sensible decision to have the Captain killed. 

(Contrary to popular belief, they didn’t eat his body - cannibalism wasn’t their custom. However, in a turn of events entirely befitting his name, he was in fact cooked.)

[mod note] It’s my understanding that Cook’s death happened during an armed conflict that was the result of his own poor decisions-he was also described by eyewitnesses as being “irrationally violent”. Although some histories claim that a Hawaiian man “stole” one of his boats, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that he was actually taking hostages to try and secure the return of his own men who had deserted (yet again).  He could be said to have been “cooked”, but it was just a part of his funeral in which his bones were separated; he was given a Hawaiian burial in Kealakekua Bay.

(via leradr)

thekimonogallery:

'Sensō-ji Agyō .  This was taken at Sensō-ji's famous Kaminari gate in the Asakusa district of Tokyo. This is a Nio gate, the one finds in front of most major Buddhist temples. “Nio” refers to the two fierce-looking Buddhist deities Agyō and Ungyō. Agyō is the one with his mouth open making an “ah” sound. Ungyō has his mouth sealed tight, as to not let good luck escape, making an “umm” sound.’  August 15, 2014, Japan.  Text and photography by rekishi no Tabi on Flickr

(via leradr)

ciorsdan:

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, Luxor, Egypt
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallacefsk/5311861498/in/set-72157625718505112/